A First Look at Azure Ultra SSD

PAUL SCHNACKENBURG | December 12, 2018

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Storage in public clouds has always been an interesting problem. The importance of IOPS and throughput are highlighted by the fact that every Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) VM size in Azure has specific limitations on those figures, on a per-disk basis and overall for the particular VM size. Often, sizing a VM for memory and vCPU is an easier task than knowing what kind of disk performance the application it's running requires. Today, Azure offers three types of disk storage that you can use with your IaaS VMs (I looked at this back in August 2018), Standard HDD, Standard SSD and Premium SSD. The two Standard offerings provide the same IOPS (500 IOPS/disk) and throughput (60Mbps throughput), but the SSD-based storage offers even more performance with lower latency. Standard HDD and SSD are sufficient for many basic workloads that aren't disk bound. For high-performance database workloads and other applications that require good storage performance you should use Premium SSD.

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