Cloud computing and virtualization, explained

| January 10, 2017

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Whether you’re a business owner or system administrator, you’ve probably been approached about “cloud computing,” an umbrella term encompassing many different platforms and a major source of confusion. The two most commonly referenced platforms are virtual machines and software as a service (SaaS), which are two inherently similar solutions that, in a nutshell, provide software-based systems and cloud services.If you’re operating a business, chances are good you deliver application and file access via one or more physical servers to multiple computers. Virtualization can help you consolidate multiple servers onto a single piece of hardware, resulting in less power consumption, maintenance and added space. Rather than having multiple physical machines providing your IT services, one physical server can accommodate a multitude of virtual servers.

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CloudBlue

CloudBlue, an independent Ingram Micro business, is dedicated to helping service providers of all kinds build, scale and monetize cloud and digital services in the as-a-service economy. Leading telecommunications companies, technology distributors, managed services providers and value-added resellers rely on CloudBlue’s leading commerce platform to automate, aggregate and sell both their own cloud services as well as those from third party ISVs. CloudBlue powers more than 200 of the world’s largest service provider cloud marketplaces, which collectively represents more than 27 million enterprise cloud subscriptions and $1B subscription revenue. CloudBlue provides its customers access to an ecosystem that includes more than 200 ISV solutions and more than 80,000 resellers around the world. CloudBlue is an independent software division of Ingram Micro, comprised of more than 700 professionals from engineering, product management, sales, marketing and operations.

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Spotlight

CloudBlue

CloudBlue, an independent Ingram Micro business, is dedicated to helping service providers of all kinds build, scale and monetize cloud and digital services in the as-a-service economy. Leading telecommunications companies, technology distributors, managed services providers and value-added resellers rely on CloudBlue’s leading commerce platform to automate, aggregate and sell both their own cloud services as well as those from third party ISVs. CloudBlue powers more than 200 of the world’s largest service provider cloud marketplaces, which collectively represents more than 27 million enterprise cloud subscriptions and $1B subscription revenue. CloudBlue provides its customers access to an ecosystem that includes more than 200 ISV solutions and more than 80,000 resellers around the world. CloudBlue is an independent software division of Ingram Micro, comprised of more than 700 professionals from engineering, product management, sales, marketing and operations.

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