Cloud-native group seeks interoperability for serverless computing

| March 1, 2018

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Serverless computing is rapidly emerging as a viable option for enterprises looking to run cloud-native workloads, according to a new whitepaper published by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation this week.The CNCF defines serverless computing as a framework for building and running applications that do not require server management. With serverless computing, the cloud hosting provider allocates resources as they’re needed, instead of charging upfront for dedicated capacity. It’s also worth pointing out that the term “serverless” is a bit misleading, as servers are still required. However, the cloud providers themselves manage the virtual machines and application containers along with servers, freeing up developers to focus on what they do best.

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Norse Corporation

Norse is the global leader in live attack intelligence, helping companies block the threats that other systems miss. Serving the world’s largest financial, government and technology organizations, Norse intelligence offerings dramatically improve the performance, catch-rate, and return-on-investment of the entire security infrastructure.

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