DNA Center Breakdown: What is it and what can it do?

| August 1, 2018

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Cisco's DNA Center is switching up the way that we do networking with the launch of their Digital Network Architecture (DNA Center). Our killer Route and Switch engineer, Jeremy Ryder, breaks down what DNA Center really is and what it means for networking. Cisco keeps saying that it's an intuitive network, what does that really mean? What's the difference between SDN and DNA Center?

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Positive Technologies

Positive Technologies is an independent high-growth global cybersecurity company with 700 people in ten offices on four continents. In a world increasingly run on code, vulnerable software presents a huge risk to all areas of business and critical infrastructure, a problem we believe will believe only grow in scale, complexity and seriousness. Positive Technologies analyses these vulnerabilities in one of Europe’s largest specialist laboratories, using this research to build a platform capable of automatically finding and neutralizing them prior to attack.

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Spotlight

Positive Technologies

Positive Technologies is an independent high-growth global cybersecurity company with 700 people in ten offices on four continents. In a world increasingly run on code, vulnerable software presents a huge risk to all areas of business and critical infrastructure, a problem we believe will believe only grow in scale, complexity and seriousness. Positive Technologies analyses these vulnerabilities in one of Europe’s largest specialist laboratories, using this research to build a platform capable of automatically finding and neutralizing them prior to attack.

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